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The Friday Five: May 27, 2011

Friday Five

Friday Five : ‘frī-(,)dā,-dē ‘fīv : On the sixth day of every week, I hit the shuffle button on my iTunes, then share the first five tracks and thought for each track. Sometimes there is a playlist involved, occasionally we’ll have a guest, but most of the time it’s just me. The rest is up to you, our friends and readers! Fire up your media player of choice and share the first five random track of your shuffle in the comments.

The Five:

“My Country” by tUnE-YaRdS (from WHOKILL, 2011)

This is the first time I’m hearing anything from this record, which comes very highly recommended by my Popdose alum—and frequent flyer with the Friday Five—Michael Fortes. It reminds me a bit of Ween, filtered through a Sonic Youth colored lens. I’ll have to queue this up for the long weekend.

“Anna Begins” by Counting Crows (from Films About Ghosts: The Best of…, 2003)

This is, for me, Adam Duritz’s greatest moment as a songwriter.

“The Same December” from Prince (from Chaos and Disorder, 1996)

For every bit of praise I lavished on Come a few weeks back, I have to decry Chaos and Disorder. Does anyone else recall the full court press promotional tour for this record? I swear, there must be a dozen television performances of “Dinner With Delores” out there.

“Transatlanticism” by Death Cab for Cutie (from Transatlanticism, 2003)

Buy Codes and Keys. Seriously, you’ll thank me.

‘Bonita Applebum (radio edit)” by A Tribe Called Quest (from Bonita Applebum, 1990)

With this, I’m kicking off the Friday Dance Party.

What’s on your shuffle today?

Published inFriday Five

38 Comments

  1. EightE1 EightE1

    Cheap Trick, “Tonight It’s You.” A Number One hit for five weeks in the Billboard Pop Chart that exists in a dimension only I can visit.

    Boz Scaggs, “Gimme the Goods.” Down Two then Left is an underrated record. 

    Leonard Cohen, “The Partisan.” If you haven’t yet, get over to Popdose and check out this month’s Popdose Podcast, one of the best they’ve done. In one segment, Jeff Giles mentions how he’s never really gotten into Leonard Cohen, though he knows he should. I’m with him on that.

    NRBQ, “How Can I Make You Love Me.” Love the Q. Terry Adams musta thought I was stalking him about ten years ago.  Saw the band twice in a six-month period; first time I was sloppy drunk, stood at the lip of the stage and danced and drank (and I’m not a dancer), before sneaking backstage after the show to sloppily congratulate the Q on a fan-fucking-tastic concert. I believe I used those very words. Six months later, at a different venue, I checked out early from the opening act’s show to hit the men’s room, and encountered Adams again, standing just down the hall. I shook his hand and welcomed him back to town; he looked at me with something approaching panic.  I think he remembered me. Ah, well …

    Rush, “Mystic Rhythms.” The whole reason I bought Power Windows, an album I otherwise do not care for.

    • MichaelFortes MichaelFortes

      Totally agree re: “Tonight It’s You.” How on earth did that song not at least crack the top 40??  Ditto re: Down Two Then Left. It’s a lot busier than Silk Degrees or Middle Man, but that just makes me like it even more.

  2. EightE1 EightE1

    Cheap Trick, “Tonight It’s You.” A Number One hit for five weeks in the Billboard Pop Chart that exists in a dimension only I can visit.

    Boz Scaggs, “Gimme the Goods.” Down Two then Left is an underrated record. 

    Leonard Cohen, “The Partisan.” If you haven’t yet, get over to Popdose and check out this month’s Popdose Podcast, one of the best they’ve done. In one segment, Jeff Giles mentions how he’s never really gotten into Leonard Cohen, though he knows he should. I’m with him on that.

    NRBQ, “How Can I Make You Love Me.” Love the Q. Terry Adams musta thought I was stalking him about ten years ago.  Saw the band twice in a six-month period; first time I was sloppy drunk, stood at the lip of the stage and danced and drank (and I’m not a dancer), before sneaking backstage after the show to sloppily congratulate the Q on a fan-fucking-tastic concert. I believe I used those very words. Six months later, at a different venue, I checked out early from the opening act’s show to hit the men’s room, and encountered Adams again, standing just down the hall. I shook his hand and welcomed him back to town; he looked at me with something approaching panic.  I think he remembered me. Ah, well …

    Rush, “Mystic Rhythms.” The whole reason I bought Power Windows, an album I otherwise do not care for.

    • Anonymous Anonymous

      Totally agree re: “Tonight It’s You.” How on earth did that song not at least crack the top 40??  Ditto re: Down Two Then Left. It’s a lot busier than Silk Degrees or Middle Man, but that just makes me like it even more.

  3. “We’ll Be Together Again” – Frank Sinatra. Not the best track on Songs For Swingin’ Lovers, but The Voice and Nelson RIddle’s arrangement still make it worthwhile.

    “The Ties That Bind” – Bruce Springsteen (Take 8, from The Lost Masters Series). Very similar to the released version, but with more 12-string and different vocals and harmonies.

    “I Feel Fine” – The Ventures. A smokin’ instrumental cover of The Beatles recorded live in Japan. I’m guessing I got this from the Popdose Beatles mix when the CDs were reissued.

    “Boomboxes And Dictionaries” – The Gaslight Anthem. Opening cut from their first album. Love this one. Killer chorus.

    “More Than A Woman” – The Bee Gees. There’s a wonderful dynamic going on here. There’s a feeling of time standing still and yet there’s a lot of movement in the chords, with two pre-choruses. That’s probably why it worked so well in the movie and why The Bee Gees have withstood the disco backlash. And a little known fact about this song: it was written about Jeff Giles’ mom after a particularly special night on the tour bus.

  4. “We’ll
    Be Together Again” – Frank Sinatra. Not the best track on Songs For
    Swingin’ Lovers, but The Voice and Nelson RIddle’s arrangement still
    make it worthwhile.

    “The Ties That Bind” – Bruce Springsteen
    (Take 8, from The Lost Masters Series). Very similar to the released
    version, but with more 12-string and different vocals and harmonies.

    “I Feel Fine” – The Ventures. A smokin’
    instrumental cover of The Beatles recorded live in Japan. I’m guessing I
    got this from the Popdose Beatles mix when the CDs were reissued.

    “Boomboxes And Dictionaries” – The Gaslight Anthem. Opening cut from their first album. Love this one. Killer chorus.

    “More Than A Woman” – The Bee Gees.
    There’s a wonderful dynamic going on here. There’s a feeling of time
    standing still and yet there’s a lot of movement in the chords, with two
    pre-choruses. That’s probably why it worked so well in the movie and
    why The Bee Gees have withstood the disco backlash. And a little known
    fact about this song: it was written about Jeff Giles’ mom after a
    particularly special night on the tour bus. 

  5. “Lust to Love,” The Go-Go’s, from the Go-Go’s Collection.
    “Easily,” Red Hot Chili Peppers from Californication.
    “Wichita Skyline,” Shawn Colvin from A Few Small Repairs.
    “China Doll,” Grateful Dead from Grateful Dead From The Mars Hotel.
    “Accidents Will Happen,” Elvis Costello & The Attractions from The Best of Elvis Costello: The First 10 Years.

    Have a great long weekend!

  6. “Lust to Love,” The Go-Go’s, from the Go-Go’s Collection.
    “Easily,” Red Hot Chili Peppers from Californication.
    “Wichita Skyline,” Shawn Colvin from A Few Small Repairs.
    “China Doll,” Grateful Dead from Grateful Dead From The Mars Hotel.
    “Accidents Will Happen,” Elvis Costello & The Attractions from The Best of Elvis Costello: The First 10 Years.

    Have a great long weekend!

  7. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

    • Much love for the Kwamé track! Polka dots in the house!

    • MichaelFortes MichaelFortes

      Elvis still kills it live. I’ve seen him a handful of times over the past 5 years and he’s just astounding. If you get a chance to see him, don’t skip out!

  8. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  9. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  10. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

    • Much love for the Kwamé track! Polka dots in the house!

    • Anonymous Anonymous

      Elvis still kills it live. I’ve seen him a handful of times over the past 5 years and he’s just astounding. If you get a chance to see him, don’t skip out!

  11. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  12. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  13. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  14. Mike Mike

    Happy Friday, everyone!! Ready for the long weekend!!

    1) “Theme from the Black Hole” by Parliament- George Clinton’s records are so weird, but so fun. You can definitely hear his vocal group past coming back to haunt him on this one-parts of it sound like a tripped-out Temptations song. I just realized that this song was where Digital Underground interpolated “Same Song” (otherwise known as the recording debut of 2Pac.)

    2) “Ownlee Eue (Only You)” by Kwame & a New Beginning- Late Eighties/Early Nineties rapper with serious musical skills. He unfortunately got caught up in a gimmick (polka dot outfits) and never got his proper due. This was his biggest hit, which isn’t saying much. Nevertheless, he’s still around-he’s produced tracks for Will Smith and Christina Aguilera.

    3) “I Stand Accused” by Elvis Costello & the Attractions- Maybe not so much now, but I’d love to have seen Elvis circa early Eighties backed by a tight soul band.

    4) “All ‘n All” by Al Green- This was from “The Belle Album”, which I don’t think Willie Mitchell produced. Which is probably why this song sounds like church revival meets Diana Ross & the Supremes. Soon-to-be Reverend Al is testifyin’, though.

    5) “Teo Torriate (Let Us Cling Together)” by Queen- Freddie was, is, and always will be the man.

  15. ljhord ljhord

    1.  “Angel Dance” – Los Lobos from “Just Another Band From East L.A.”
    2.  “Simple Man” – Bad Company from “Run With The Pack”
    3.  “All The Time In The World” – The Subdudes from “Primitive Streak”
    4.  “I Can’t Turn You Loose” – Otis Redding from “The Very Best Of Otis Redding, Disc 1”
    5.  “Shake Your Hips” The Rolling Stones from “Exile On Main Street”

    Dang, I might have to make a playlist of those five!

  16. Anonymous Anonymous

    1.  “Angel Dance” – Los Lobos from “Just Another Band From East L.A.”
    2.  “Simple Man” – Bad Company from “Run With The Pack”
    3.  “All The Time In The World” – The Subdudes from “Primitive Streak”
    4.  “I Can’t Turn You Loose” – Otis Redding from “The Very Best Of Otis Redding, Disc 1”
    5.  “Shake Your Hips” The Rolling Stones from “Exile On Main Street”

    Dang, I might have to make a playlist of those five!

  17. BillC BillC

    Maralinga-Paul Kelly live at the Continental.  One of my favorite PK songs.  Hauntingly beautiful. Every time I hear this I wonder why he isn’t a superstar.
    Tom Petty- You Tell Me from Damn the Torpedoes.  I don’t remember this song from when I first listened to this album, but it is a great tune.
    Hat Full of Start-Cyndi Lauper.  Title track from her first stint at the “torch singer” routine. I generally like this album, but not this song.
    Just Like Joe Meek’s Blues-Graham Parker from Burning Questions. Much like with the Petty song I don’t really remember this song but that might be because GP has so much music it is hard to keep track. But this is a wonderful song.
    Cheyenne-The Del Lords from Based On A True Story. I freaking love this song and this album. I played it so much I had to replace it. Twice.  Fortunately it is now in iTunes so I don’t have to go searching for a third copy. 

  18. BillC BillC

    Maralinga-Paul Kelly live at the Continental.  One of my favorite PK songs.  Hauntingly beautiful. Every time I hear this I wonder why he isn’t a superstar.
    Tom Petty- You Tell Me from Damn the Torpedoes.  I don’t remember this song from when I first listened to this album, but it is a great tune.
    Hat Full of Start-Cyndi Lauper.  Title track from her first stint at the “torch singer” routine. I generally like this album, but not this song.
    Just Like Joe Meek’s Blues-Graham Parker from Burning Questions. Much like with the Petty song I don’t really remember this song but that might be because GP has so much music it is hard to keep track. But this is a wonderful song.
    Cheyenne-The Del Lords from Based On A True Story. I freaking love this song and this album. I played it so much I had to replace it. Twice.  Fortunately it is now in iTunes so I don’t have to go searching for a third copy. 

  19. 1. Groove Armada – “Fall Silent” (from ‘Black Light’, 2010)

    2. Joe Strummer – “Afro Cuban Be Bop”

    3. Dire Straits – “Private Investigations” (live, 28 June 1992)

    4. John Prine – “Living in the Future” (from ‘Storm Windows’, 1980)

    5. Tom Petty – “Big Boss Man” (from ‘Playback / Through the Cracks’, 1995)

  20. 1. Groove Armada – “Fall Silent” (from ‘Black Light’, 2010)

    2. Joe Strummer – “Afro Cuban Be Bop”

    3. Dire Straits – “Private Investigations” (live, 28 June 1992)

    4. John Prine – “Living in the Future” (from ‘Storm Windows’, 1980)

    5. Tom Petty – “Big Boss Man” (from ‘Playback / Through the Cracks’, 1995)

  21. de10ero de10ero

    The O’Jays-Backstabbers

    What they do? They smile in your face

    Peter Wolf-Nothing But The Wheel

    Mick and Peter all busted up and driving

    The Specials-Ghost Town

    Ska punk spookiness

    Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs-You’re So Vain

    Faithful knockoff of the Carly Simon kiss off

    John Fogerty-Rocking All Over The World

    Pretty close to that old Creedence magic, I la-la-la like it

  22. de10ero de10ero

    The O’Jays-Backstabbers

    What they do? They smile in your face

    Peter Wolf-Nothing But The Wheel

    Mick and Peter all busted up and driving

    The Specials-Ghost Town

    Ska punk spookiness

    Matthew Sweet & Susanna Hoffs-You’re So Vain

    Faithful knockoff of the Carly Simon kiss off

    John Fogerty-Rocking All Over The World

    Pretty close to that old Creedence magic, I la-la-la like it

  23. MichaelFortes MichaelFortes

    Alright, some tUnE-yArDs love! Funny how we hear different things in ’em. I hear what it might have sounded like if Nina Simone grabbed hold of Fela Kuti’s band. Also yeah, I remember the Chaos and Disorder promo blitz very well, I think I watched 0(+> play “Dinner with Delores” on “Good Morning America” or something like that. I loved how the album was really guitar heavy, but yeah, he has done better. I don’t really listen to that record at all anymore…

    “Party Line” by The Kinks (from Face To Face, 1966)
    I’ve met more Kinks fans in the bay area than I can keep track of. I never gave them much thought beyond their hits and the cassette of Sleepwalker that my uncle gave me when I was a kid, but I’ve since dug into more of their albums and have a greater appreciation for them. This song and album are OK, but “Sunny Afternoon” definitely overshadows everything else on it.

    “Love Like A Man” by Ten Years After (from Cricklewood Green, 1970)
    I still remember the day I heard Ten Years After for the first time, watching a 20th anniversary rebroadcast of Woodstock on (I think) MTV and being totally mesmerized by Alvin Lee’s insane guitar playing on “I’m Going Home.” I’ve picked up a handful of their records since then, and I’d say that Cricklewood Green is by far the best of ’em. This song is a slow burning highlight that jams out at the end.

    “Om Nashi Me” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below, 2009)
    I was turned on to these traveling folk hippies last year. Super fun band, really good tunes, though this one is more just a chant over a three chord jam (albeit a really tight and melodic jam, with horns).

    “Broken Shadows” by Ornette Coleman (from Crisis, 1972)
    This mournful, very memorable and melodic tune is from my favorite Ornette Coleman period, that time from ’69 to ’72 where he was playing with Dewey Redman. It was the peak and end of his first acoustic period before he changed course and spent the next 15 or so years concentrating mostly on his electric Prime Time band. Crisis is a live album, one of two he released on the Impulse label. Both are out of print. It’s insane how these two records have never made it to the digital age except through fan-made vinyl rips!

    “Baby’s Got Another” (extended club mix) by Richard Jon Smith (1983)
    I have a couple of dance/R&B mixes on my iPod, with tunes mostly from the early ’80s. This is from one of those mixes, taken from a vinyl 12″ single. The primary reason I downloaded it was because I wanted the 12″ extended mix of “Outstanding” by the Gap Band – the album version is just too damn short! I ended up digging most of the rest of the tunes too, and this one is no exception.

    • I definitely agree with you on the “guitar heavy” aspect of the record, but knowing that The Undertaker was out there, in the vaults, I couldn’t help but be disappointed. 

  24. Anonymous Anonymous

    Alright, some tUnE-yArDs love! Funny how we hear different things in ’em. I hear what it might have sounded like if Nina Simone grabbed hold of Fela Kuti’s band. Also yeah, I remember the Chaos and Disorder promo blitz very well, I think I watched 0(+> play “Dinner with Delores” on “Good Morning America” or something like that. I loved how the album was really guitar heavy, but yeah, he has done better. I don’t really listen to that record at all anymore…

    “Party Line” by The Kinks (from Face To Face, 1966)
    I’ve met more Kinks fans in the bay area than I can keep track of. I never gave them much thought beyond their hits and the cassette of Sleepwalker that my uncle gave me when I was a kid, but I’ve since dug into more of their albums and have a greater appreciation for them. This song and album are OK, but “Sunny Afternoon” definitely overshadows everything else on it.

    “Love Like A Man” by Ten Years After (from Cricklewood Green, 1970)
    I still remember the day I heard Ten Years After for the first time, watching a 20th anniversary rebroadcast of Woodstock on (I think) MTV and being totally mesmerized by Alvin Lee’s insane guitar playing on “I’m Going Home.” I’ve picked up a handful of their records since then, and I’d say that Cricklewood Green is by far the best of ’em. This song is a slow burning highlight that jams out at the end.

    “Om Nashi Me” by Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros (from Up From Below, 2009)
    I was turned on to these traveling folk hippies last year. Super fun band, really good tunes, though this one is more just a chant over a three chord jam (albeit a really tight and melodic jam, with horns).

    “Broken Shadows” by Ornette Coleman (from Crisis, 1972)
    This mournful, very memorable and melodic tune is from my favorite Ornette Coleman period, that time from ’69 to ’72 where he was playing with Dewey Redman. It was the peak and end of his first acoustic period before he changed course and spent the next 15 or so years concentrating mostly on his electric Prime Time band. Crisis is a live album, one of two he released on the Impulse label. Both are out of print. It’s insane how these two records have never made it to the digital age except through fan-made vinyl rips!

    “Baby’s Got Another” (extended club mix) by Richard Jon Smith (1983)
    I have a couple of dance/R&B mixes on my iPod, with tunes mostly from the early ’80s. This is from one of those mixes, taken from a vinyl 12″ single. The primary reason I downloaded it was because I wanted the 12″ extended mix of “Outstanding” by the Gap Band – the album version is just too damn short! I ended up digging most of the rest of the tunes too, and this one is no exception.

    • I definitely agree with you on the “guitar heavy” aspect of the record, but knowing that The Undertaker was out there, in the vaults, I couldn’t help but be disappointed. 

  25. John Campbell, “Person to Person” — from “One Believer”
    The Band, “The Unfaithful Servant” — from “The Band”
    They Might Be Giants, “Absolutely Bill’s Mood” — from “They Might Be Giants”
    Bill Frisell, “What a World” — from “Ghost Town”
    The Call, “This Is Your Life” — from “Live Under the Red Moon”

  26. John Campbell, “Person to Person” — from “One Believer”
    The Band, “The Unfaithful Servant” — from “The Band”
    They Might Be Giants, “Absolutely Bill’s Mood” — from “They Might Be Giants”
    Bill Frisell, “What a World” — from “Ghost Town”
    The Call, “This Is Your Life” — from “Live Under the Red Moon”

  27. Dennis Corrigan Dennis Corrigan

    Reading this Op-Ed piece (http://nyti.ms/iZk1tI) celebrating Dylan’s birthday in the Times got me thinking about what I was listening to when I was 14, so my Friday Five today celebrates 1980. 
    1.       “Twilight” by U2 from Boy.  I didn’t actually start in with U2 until War came out in ’83, but when I went back to Boy it quickly became my favorite of the early U2 albums.  Remember when all they wanted to be was the biggest rock band in the world?  Now they’re on Idol flogging a train wreck of a Broadway show.
    2.       “Cadillac Ranch” by Bruce Springsteen from the River.  The first Springsteen record I can remember listening to all the way through.  Some people I babysat for had it, and when the kdis went to sleep I put on a pair of those big white can headphones and turned it up.  At 14 I was drawn more to the rave ups on the album like this one, but as I’ve gotten wiser, the record has changed for me.  Getting to see him perform the album at MSG ranks up there on my concert highlight list.
    3.       “Have A Drink On Me” by AC/DC from Back In Black.  By way of context, in 1980 we were living on a small Army base in a small town in Germany.  There were two places to get records – the post exchange which was relatively inexpensive but limited largely to new, popular releases and smaller store in the town that had a good selection but was a lot more expensive.  You could order from Columbia House, but that took forever.  When you were buying albums with hard earned babysitting & lawn mowing money,  the PX was where you went.  I remember walking back up the hill with this one under my arm, dropping the needle, turning it up and banging my head for hours.
    4.       “Panorama” by the Cars from Panorama.  Candy-O was one of the first records I bought not made by someone like Kiss, Aerosmith, Rush or Ted Nugent.  When this came out I snapped it up at the PX, put it on the turntable and waited to hear more songs like “Let’s Go” or “Since I Held You”.  I distinctly remember thinking “what the hell is this?”,  It’s still my least favorite Cars record.
    5.       “You May Be Right” by Billy Joel from Glass Houses.  Another record I first listened to while babysitting under the headphones (along with a bunch of Bob Seger records).  This was Joel’s “rock” album.  I still kind of dig it.
     
    Hope you hear something good while firing up the BBQ this weekend!

  28. Reading this Op-Ed piece celebrating Dylan’s birthday in the Times got me thinking about what I was listening to when I was 14, so my Friday Five today celebrates 1980. 
    1.       “Twilight” by U2 from Boy.  I didn’t actually start in with U2 until War came out in ’83, but when I went back to Boy it quickly became my favorite of the early U2 albums.  Remember when all they wanted to be was the biggest rock band in the world?  Now they’re on Idol flogging a train wreck of a Broadway show.
    2.       “Cadillac Ranch” by Bruce Springsteen from the River.  The first Springsteen record I can remember listening to all the way through.  Some people I babysat for had it, and when the kdis went to sleep I put on a pair of those big white can headphones and turned it up.  At 14 I was drawn more to the rave ups on the album like this one, but as I’ve gotten wiser, the record has changed for me.  Getting to see him perform the album at MSG ranks up there on my concert highlight list.
    3.       “Have A Drink On Me” by AC/DC from Back In Black.  By way of context, in 1980 we were living on a small Army base in a small town in Germany.  There were two places to get records – the post exchange which was relatively inexpensive but limited largely to new, popular releases and smaller store in the town that had a good selection but was a lot more expensive.  You could order from Columbia House, but that took forever.  When you were buying albums with hard earned babysitting & lawn mowing money,  the PX was where you went.  I remember walking back up the hill with this one under my arm, dropping the needle, turning it up and banging my head for hours.
    4.       “Panorama” by the Cars from Panorama.  Candy-O was one of the first records I bought not made by someone like Kiss, Aerosmith, Rush or Ted Nugent.  When this came out I snapped it up at the PX, put it on the turntable and waited to hear more songs like “Let’s Go” or “Since I Held You”.  I distinctly remember thinking “what the hell is this?”,  It’s still my least favorite Cars record.
    5.       “You May Be Right” by Billy Joel from Glass Houses.  Another record I first listened to while babysitting under the headphones (along with a bunch of Bob Seger records).  This was Joel’s “rock” album.  I still kind of dig it.
     
    Hope you hear something good while firing up the BBQ this weekend!

  29. KellyStitzel KellyStitzel

    “Bullshit” by Grace Jones from Warm Leatherette (1980). This is a great way to start off this Five, I think.
    “Salt in the Wound” by Beck from Sexx Laws single (1999). This is one of my favorite B-Sides from any artist. This really should’ve made it onto Midnite Vultures.
    “Lovertits” by Peaches from The Teaches of Peaches (2000). This is turning out to be a sassy Five.
    “Haute Tropique” by Man Man from Life Fantastic (2011). I am 100% obsessed with this album. I cannot stop listening to it.
    “Lemme Get Some” by Amanda Blank from I Love You (2009). Fuck yes. “No I can’t introduce you to M.I.A.”

  30. Anonymous Anonymous

    “Bullshit” by Grace Jones from Warm Leatherette (1980). This is a great way to start off this Five, I think.
    “Salt in the Wound” by Beck from Sexx Laws single (1999). This is one of my favorite B-Sides from any artist. This really should’ve made it onto Midnite Vultures.
    “Lovertits” by Peaches from The Teaches of Peaches (2000). This is turning out to be a sassy Five.
    “Haute Tropique” by Man Man from Life Fantastic (2011). I am 100% obsessed with this album. I cannot stop listening to it.
    “Lemme Get Some” by Amanda Blank from I Love You (2009). Fuck yes. “No I can’t introduce you to M.I.A.”

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