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The Friday Five: September 16, 2011

Friday Five

Friday Five : ‘frī-(,)dā,-dē ‘fīv : On the sixth day of every week, I hit the shuffle button on my iTunes, then share the first five tracks and thought for each track. Sometimes there is a playlist involved, occasionally we’ll have a guest, but most of the time it’s just me. The rest is up to you, our friends and readers! Fire up your media player of choice and share the first five random track of your shuffle in the comments.

The Five:

“Class Act” by James Hunter (from The Hard Way, 2008)

Whoa! Where the hell has this been hiding? I’ve had this on my hard drive for a few weeks—courtesy of Jeff Giles—but hadn’t had the chance to listen to it. I’m going to have to go back after the Five is done and listen to the rest of this.

Mixed Nuts” by DJ Krush (from Krush, 1995)

This is the second week that a musical segue showed up in the second slot. Boo!

Runaround” by Van Halen (from The Best of Both Worlds, 2004)

Now this is more like it! I remember burning out not one, but two copies of For Unlawful Carnal Knowledge when it initially came out. For me, this track is the closest that Van Hagar got to sounding like Van Halen, with the breakdown recalling the tongue-in-cheek sexual innuendo of “Panama,” and the infectious main riff recalling any one of Eddie’s early rockers. Shit, I’m hitting repeat on this one.

Best Friend” by The Drums (from The Drums, 2010)

I’m calling this one a ‘jaunty, feel good tune!’

True Love Ways” by Peter & Gordon (from Top of the Pops 1965, 2007)

What an odd way to finish off the Five. With that, onto the weekend!

What’s on your shuffle today?

Published inFriday Five

30 Comments

  1. ice making machine ice making machine

    thank you for sharing 

  2. ice making machine ice making machine

    thank you for sharing 

  3. Mike Mike

    1) “The Rooster” by OutKast: I don’t know why Big Boi is so underrated.
    2) “Gettin’ Down At The Ampitheater” by Common: I guess the ol’ iPod is in hip-hop mode tonight. Excellent collaboration with De La Soul.
    3) “Cleanin’ Up The Town” by The Bus Boys: Eddie Murphy’s favorite band! He should make them the house band at the Oscars.
    4) “You Talk Too Much” by Run-DMC: Very hip-hop tonight. Some of Run-DMC’s early stuff is silly as hell, but fun to listen to.
    5) “Expressway to Your Heart” by The Soul Survivors: Good way to end this Five. 

  4. Mike Mike

    1) “The Rooster” by OutKast: I don’t know why Big Boi is so underrated.
    2) “Gettin’ Down At The Ampitheater” by Common: I guess the ol’ iPod is in hip-hop mode tonight. Excellent collaboration with De La Soul.
    3) “Cleanin’ Up The Town” by The Bus Boys: Eddie Murphy’s favorite band! He should make them the house band at the Oscars.
    4) “You Talk Too Much” by Run-DMC: Very hip-hop tonight. Some of Run-DMC’s early stuff is silly as hell, but fun to listen to.
    5) “Expressway to Your Heart” by The Soul Survivors: Good way to end this Five. 

  5. jhallCORE jhallCORE

    1. Patty Griffin — “Move Up” (Downtown Church, 2010). Rousing country gospel from one of our most versatile singer-songwriters.
    2. Paul Simon — “She Moves On” (Concert In The Park, 1991). It was a privilege to be among the reported 750,000 or so who showed up for this amazing free concert in Central Park. Lilting percussive rhythms, jazz-tinged brass, percolating guitar accents and soulful backing vocals.
    3. Joshua Redman — “Chill” (Mood Swing, 1994). The saxophonist allows enough room for sidemen like pianist Brad Mehldau to explore while maintaining a simpatico, laid-back groove. Highlight: Redman’s call ‘n response with bassist Christian McBride.
    4. J.J. Johnson — “Amazing Grace” (Tangence, 1995). The late trombonist starts out with a warm. faithful rendition but as the string accompaniment becomes more pronounced, it frees Johnson up for tender improvisation that nonetheless remains true to the song.
    5. Cyrus Chestnut — “Steps Of Trane” (Dark Before The Dawn, 1994). Chestnut is one of my favorite jazz pianists and this cut is from one of his early albums as a leader. Love the limber spirited volleys he serves up so freely with his crew.

  6. Anonymous Anonymous

    1. Patty Griffin — “Move Up” (Downtown Church, 2010). Rousing country gospel from one of our most versatile singer-songwriters.
    2. Paul Simon — “She Moves On” (Concert In The Park, 1991). It was a privilege to be among the reported 750,000 or so who showed up for this amazing free concert in Central Park. Lilting percussive rhythms, jazz-tinged brass, percolating guitar accents and soulful backing vocals.
    3. Joshua Redman — “Chill” (Mood Swing, 1994). The saxophonist allows enough room for sidemen like pianist Brad Mehldau to explore while maintaining a simpatico, laid-back groove. aid-back groove. Highlight: Redman’s call ‘n response with bassist Christian McBride.
    4. J.J. Johnson — “Amazing Grace” (Tangence, 1995). The late trombonist starts out with a warm. faithful rendition but as the string accompaniment becomes more pronounced, it frees Johnson up for tender improvisation that nonetheless remains true to the song.
    5. Cyrus Chestnut — “Steps Of Trane” (Dark Before The Dawn, 1994). Chestnut is one of my favorite jazz pianists and this cut is from one of his early albums as a leader. Love the limber spirited volleys he serves up so freely with his crew.

  7. 1) Chris Bell – “Better Save Yourself” (I Am the Cosmos)
    2) Donny Hathaway – “Thank You Master (For My Soul)” (Everything Is Everything)
    3) Grateful Dead – “Radio Promo for American Beauty” (The Golden Road [1965 – 1973])
    4) George Michael – “Waiting For That Day” (Listen Without Prejudice)
    5) The Band – “Rockin’ Chair” (Rock of Ages)
    weeeeeeeeeeeee!

  8. 1) Chris Bell – “Better Save Yourself” (I Am the Cosmos)
    2) Donny Hathaway – “Thank You Master (For My Soul)” (Everything Is Everything)
    3) Grateful Dead – “Radio Promo for American Beauty” (The Golden Road [1965 – 1973])
    4) George Michael – “Waiting For That Day” (Listen Without Prejudice)
    5) The Band – “Rockin’ Chair” (Rock of Ages)
    weeeeeeeeeeeee!

  9. Packing up to head out of town and off the grid, but here’s my Friday Five:

    1. “Crying” by Ray Charles off the Ray Charles Anthology.  I’ve been on a massive R&B kick lately, so this sad one from the Genius is a fitting start.
    2. “A Taste of Honey” by the Beatles from Live at the BBC. A live in studio version 
    3. “Lady (You Bring Me Up) by the Commodores off Hitsville U.S.A. The Singles Colleciton 1972-1992. A little lite funk’s not a bad thing
    4. “Tomorrow Never Knows” by the Beatles from Revolver.  The closer of my favorite Beatles LP. Anytime anyone slags Ringo, I point them toward this track
    5. “That’s The Way Love Is” by Marvin Gaye from Anthology – The Best of.  A nice ending to an R&B, Beatles club sandwich 

    Hope you hear something good over the next few days!

  10. Packing up to head out of town and off the grid, but here’s my Friday Five:

    1. “Crying” by Ray Charles off the Ray Charles Anthology.  I’ve been on a massive R&B kick lately, so this sad one from the Genius is a fitting start.
    2. “A Taste of Honey” by the Beatles from Live at the BBC. A live in studio version 
    3. “Lady (You Bring Me Up) by the Commodores off Hitsville U.S.A. The Singles Colleciton 1972-1992. A little lite funk’s not a bad thing
    4. “Tomorrow Never Knows” by the Beatles from Revolver.  The closer of my favorite Beatles LP. Anytime anyone slags Ringo, I point them toward this track
    5. “That’s The Way Love Is” by Marvin Gaye from Anthology – The Best of.  A nice ending to an R&B, Beatles club sandwich 

    Hope you hear something good over the next few days!

  11. “24 Hours (To Find My Baby)” – The Funk Brothers. An album called “In The Snakepit” that may or may not be a bootleg, but it’s instrumental tracks of Motown records so you can hear just how incredible those guys were.
    “Gravity’s Gone” – Drive-By Truckers. After “Carl Perkins’ Cadillac,” this is my favorite song by Mike “Stroker Ace” Cooley.
    “That’s Where It’s At” – Sam Cooke. Pretty sure that, like on “Bring It On Home To Me,” that’s Lou Rawls on b-vox.
    “I Like It All, Man” – Supersuckers. I think Eddie Spaghetti likes it all.
    “You Stand By Me” – The Who. Pretty song by Townshend from Endless Wire that features some nice acoustic work.

  12. “24 Hours (To Find My Baby)” – The Funk Brothers. An album called “In The Snakepit” that may or may not be a bootleg, but it’s instrumental tracks of Motown records so you can hear just how incredible those guys were.
    “Gravity’s Gone” – Drive-By Truckers. After “Carl Perkins’ Cadillac,” this is my favorite song by Mike “Stroker Ace” Cooley.
    “That’s Where It’s At” – Sam Cooke. Pretty sure that, like on “Bring It On Home To Me,” that’s Lou Rawls on b-vox.
    “I Like It All, Man” – Supersuckers. I think Eddie Spaghetti likes it all.
    “You Stand By Me” – The Who. Pretty song by Townshend from Endless Wire that features some nice acoustic work.

  13. 1. Fleetwood Mac, “Rhiannon (Single Remix)”: not sure what makes this terribly different from the original, other than being shorter. Sometimes, I have dreams about being a background vocalist – no, I’m not making that up – and it’s probably because of songs like this. Those harmonies are a delight.

    2. Matchbox Twenty, “Argue”: buying Yourself or Someone Like You was probably a good-enough idea as a kid. I won’t switch off the radio if any of those singles come up. But this album is PONDEROUS – and Rob Thomas’ voice is ridiculous, particularly early in the band’s career. I can picture the pop-eyed, nostril-flaring look on his face as he laid this one down.

    3. Stephen “Tin Tin” Duffy, “Kiss Me”: the guy who left Duran Duran, enabling Simon Le Bon to become one of the five greatest crush objects of the ’80s, had a catchy-as-hell U.K. Top 5 hit with this one. The lyrics are as ridiculous as any Duran tune (“kiss me with your mouth”…as opposed to what?), but I’m sure glad this one came up.

    4. ZZ Top, “I Got the Six”: “I got the six, gimme your nine.” Cue two-and-a-half minutes of snickering.

    5. ABBA, “The Winner Takes It All”: Must. Not. Mope. About. Recent. Breakup. The quaver in Agnetha’s voice certainly doesn’t make it easy. OK, moment passed. Happy Friday, y’all.

  14. 1. Fleetwood Mac, “Rhiannon (Single Remix)”: not sure what makes this terribly different from the original, other than being shorter. Sometimes, I have dreams about being a background vocalist – no, I’m not making that up – and it’s probably because of songs like this. Those harmonies are a delight.

    2. Matchbox Twenty, “Argue”: buying Yourself or Someone Like You was probably a good-enough idea as a kid. I won’t switch off the radio if any of those singles come up. But this album is PONDEROUS – and Rob Thomas’ voice is ridiculous, particularly early in the band’s career. I can picture the pop-eyed, nostril-flaring look on his face as he laid this one down.

    3. Stephen “Tin Tin” Duffy, “Kiss Me”: the guy who left Duran Duran, enabling Simon Le Bon to become one of the five greatest crush objects of the ’80s, had a catchy-as-hell U.K. Top 5 hit with this one. The lyrics are as ridiculous as any Duran tune (“kiss me with your mouth”…as opposed to what?), but I’m sure glad this one came up.

    4. ZZ Top, “I Got the Six”: “I got the six, gimme your nine.” Cue two-and-a-half minutes of snickering.

    5. ABBA, “The Winner Takes It All”: Must. Not. Mope. About. Recent. Breakup. The quaver in Agnetha’s voice certainly doesn’t make it easy. OK, moment passed. Happy Friday, y’all.

  15. 1. Fleetwood Mac, “Rhiannon (Single Remix)”: not sure what makes this terribly different from the original, other than being shorter. Sometimes, I have dreams about being a background vocalist – no, I’m not making that up – and it’s probably because of songs like this. Those harmonies are a delight.

    2. Matchbox Twenty, “Argue”: buying Yourself or Someone Like You was probably a good-enough idea as a kid. I won’t switch off the radio if any of those singles come up. But this album is PONDEROUS – and Rob Thomas’ voice is ridiculous, particularly early in the band’s career. I can picture the pop-eyed, nostril-flaring look on his face as he laid this one down.

    3. Stephen “Tin Tin” Duffy, “Kiss Me”: the guy who left Duran Duran, enabling Simon Le Bon to become one of the five greatest crush objects of the ’80s, had a catchy-as-hell U.K. Top 5 hit with this one. The lyrics are as ridiculous as any Duran tune (“kiss me with your mouth”…as opposed to what?), but I’m sure glad this one came up.

    4. ZZ Top, “I Got the Six”: “I got the six, gimme your nine.” Cue two-and-a-half minutes of snickering.

    5. ABBA, “The Winner Takes It All”: Must. Not. Mope. About. Recent. Breakup. The quaver in Agnetha’s voice certainly doesn’t make it easy. OK, moment passed. Happy Friday, y’all.

  16. KellyStitzel KellyStitzel

    I made a playlist of the list I contributed for Popdose’s feature on the 100 Greatest Cover Songs of All Time. I put the list on shuffle, and here we go:

    “The Guns of Brixton” by Nouvelle Vague (Original by the Clash; #97 on my covers list) – Nouvelle Vague have made a name for themselves making charming, lounge-y covers of ’80s punk and new wave hits. This is the first cover I’d ever heard them do and it’s still my favorite.

    “The Shoop Shop Song (It’s In His Kiss) by Cher (Originally recorded by Betty Everett; #56 on my covers list) – Cher’s cover of this ’60s classic was recorded for the soundtrack of one of my favorite movies, “Mermaids.” It’s a lot of fun and her vocals are perfect for the doo-wop number.

    “Wuthering Heights” by The Puppini Sisters (Original by Kate Bush; #98 on my covers list). What would happen if the Andrews Sisters covered Kate Bush? This. And it’s wonderful.

    “She’s Got You” by Rosanne Cash (Original by Patsy Cline; #41 on my covers list). Last winter, I wrote a Versionality column about this song. Ultimately, Rosanne’s won out as my favorite version of this classic song about heartbreak and longing.

    “Season of the Witch” by Richard Thompson (Original by Donovan; #3 on my covers list). I think this song will be the topic of the next Versionality column I write, whenever that eventually happens. Thompson’s version is so haunting and gorgeous. And, even though it’s nine minutes long, I could listen to it on repeat all day.

  17. Anonymous Anonymous

    I made a playlist of the list I contributed for Popdose’s feature on the 100 Greatest Cover Songs of All Time. I put the list on shuffle, and here we go:

    “The Guns of Brixton” by Nouvelle Vague (Original by the Clash; #97 on my covers list) – Nouvelle Vague have made a name for themselves making charming, lounge-y covers of ’80s punk and new wave hits. This is the first cover I’d ever heard them do and it’s still my favorite.

    “The Shoop Shop Song (It’s In His Kiss) by Cher (Originally recorded by Betty Everett; #56 on my covers list) – Cher’s cover of this ’60s classic was recorded for the soundtrack of one of my favorite movies, “Mermaids.” It’s a lot of fun and her vocals are perfect for the doo-wop number.

    “Wuthering Heights” by The Puppini Sisters (Original by Kate Bush; #98 on my covers list). What would happen if the Andrews Sisters covered Kate Bush? This. And it’s wonderful.

    “She’s Got You” by Rosanne Cash (Original by Patsy Cline; #41 on my covers list). Last winter, I wrote a Versionality column about this song. Ultimately, Rosanne’s won out as my favorite version of this classic song about heartbreak and longing.

    “Season of the Witch” by Richard Thompson (Original by Donovan; #3 on my covers list). I think this song will be the topic of the next Versionality column I write, whenever that eventually happens. Thompson’s version is so haunting and gorgeous. And, even though it’s nine minutes long, I could listen to it on repeat all day.

  18. ljhord ljhord

    1.  “Statesboro Blues” – The Allman Brothers Band – The Allman Brothers Band-Anthology, Disc 2
    2.  “I Don’t Know Why” – Eric Clapton w/ Delaney & Bonnie & George Harrison – Converted from the YouTube video
    3.  “American Tune” – Eva Cassidy – American Tune
    4.  “Hey Me, Hey Mama” – Ray LaMontagne – Gossip In The Grain
    5.  “Born On The Bayou” – Creedence Clearwater Revival – Bad Moon Rising

    In my opinion, 5 excellent tunes there for a Friday afternoon!

  19. Anonymous Anonymous

    1.  “Statesboro Blues” – The Allman Brothers Band – The Allman Brothers Band-Anthology, Disc 2
    2.  “I Don’t Know Why” – Eric Clapton w/ Delaney & Bonnie & George Harrison – Converted from the YouTube video
    3.  “American Tune” – Eva Cassidy – American Tune
    4.  “Hey Me, Hey Mama” – Ray LaMontagne – Gossip In The Grain
    5.  “Born On The Bayou” – Creedence Clearwater Revival – Bad Moon Rising

    In my opinion, 5 excellent tunes there for a Friday afternoon!

  20. 1. “Hats Off To (Roy) Harper” – Led Zeppelin (Led Zeppelin III, 1970) 
    2. “Wishing Well” – INXS (Welcome to Wherever You Are, 1992) 
    3. “Pay For What You Got” – Dave Matthews Band (Under The Table And Dreaming, 1994)
    4. “Surrender” – U2 (War, 1983)
    5. “Prayer (Oh Doctor Jesus)” – Miles Davis (Porgy & Bess, 1958)

  21. 1. “Hats Off To (Roy) Harper” – Led Zeppelin (Led Zeppelin III, 1970) 
    2. “Wishing Well” – INXS (Welcome to Wherever You Are, 1992) 
    3. “Pay For What You Got” – Dave Matthews Band (Under The Table And Dreaming, 1994)
    4. “Surrender” – U2 (War, 1983)
    5. “Prayer (Oh Doctor Jesus)” – Miles Davis (Porgy & Bess, 1958)

  22. 1. “Hats Off To (Roy) Harper” – Led Zeppelin (Led Zeppelin III, 1970) 
    2. “Wishing Well” – INXS (Welcome to Wherever You Are, 1992) 
    3. “Pay For What You Got” – Dave Matthews Band (Under The Table And Dreaming, 1994)
    4. “Surrender” – U2 (War, 1983)
    5. “Prayer (Oh Doctor Jesus)” – Miles Davis (Porgy & Bess, 1958)

  23. Glen Phillips with Nickel Creek – “Let It Fall” (Live at the Red Light Cafe, Atlanta, GA, August, 1, 2003 at the Atlantis Music Conference)
    Newgrass trio Nickel Creek joined former Toad the Wet Sprocket frontman Glen Phillips for the second set of this excellent live performance. They played acoustic versions of everything from TTWS, Glen Phillips, and Nickel Creek tunes to Randy Newman and Elliot Smith covers. “Let It Fall” is a track from Nickel Creek guitarist Sean Watkins’ debut solo album and is one of my favorite songs that Glen has ever lent his vocals to. If you’re interested, you can pick up the entire set at the Internet Archive’s live music archive.

    Soasin – “Sleepers” (Saosin, 2006)
    Melodic emo/screamo track from Saosin’s debut album. I know little of the band’s history other than a vocalist change that at one point seemed to polarize fans of the Newport Beach, CA post-hardcore outfit. Showy, excessive, dynamic, and emotional, the track is much too short at 2:51. But I like it.

    The Cars – “You’re All I’ve Got Tonight” (The Cars, 1978)
    I can remember a time back in the early- to mid-80s in my teens when I used to spin this vinyl at least once a week—back when I actually had the vinyl and a turntable. I have neither these days, but I do have these lovely 0s and 1s to listen to whenever I get the itch for some early Cars goodness. Their debut is still one of the best albums these guys ever released.

    Hayseed Dixie – “Let’s Put the X in Sex” (Kiss My Grass: A Hillbilly Tribute to KISS, 2003)
    I’ve always had this affinity for cover tunes—even more so these days since I discovered the Coverville podcast several years ago—and over the years I’ve amassed quite a few hokey covers of songs that I never really cared for in their original form. “Let’s Put the X in Sex” is once such song, and I would like to forget that one of my favorite bands of all time ever released it. As a matter of fact, I like to pretend that the KISS of Unmasked and onward is some impostor band that has the real Gene Simmons chained up in a dungeon someplace.

    Queensrÿche – “Get a Life” (Hear in the Now Frontier, 1997)
    HITNF was the last Queensrÿche album to feature guitarist and founding member Chris DeGarmo, and in my opinion, was the point where the band began a downward spiral they have yet to pull out of. While I liked quite a bit of the followup Q2K, they have released little since this album that I could really grab onto or identify with as a huge fan of their progressive metal beginnings of The Warning and their excellent 1982 EP.

    • > HITNF was the last Queensrÿche album to feature guitarist and founding member Chris DeGarmo

      Actually what I meant to say was the last to feature DeGarmo as a full-time member. The Tribe album saw him return temporarily to collaborate with the band on a few songs and play guitar.

      • If you haven’t listened to American Soldier, you might be pleasantly surprised.

        • I’ve only heard snippets, but I have added it to my Spotify listening queue. Thanks, sir!

  24. Glen Phillips with Nickel Creek – “Let It Fall” (Live at the Red Light Cafe, Atlanta, GA, August, 1, 2003 at the Atlantis Music Conference)
    Newgrass trio Nickel Creek joined former Toad the Wet Sprocket frontman Glen Phillips for the second set of this excellent live performance. They played acoustic versions of everything from TTWS, Glen Phillips, and Nickel Creek tunes to Randy Newman and Elliot Smith covers. “Let It Fall” is a track from Nickel Creek guitarist Sean Watkins’ debut solo album and is one of my favorite songs that Glen has ever lent his vocals to. If you’re interested, you can pick up the entire set at the Internet Archive’s live music archive.

    Soasin – “Sleepers” (Saosin, 2006)
    Melodic emo/screamo track from Saosin’s debut album. I know little of the band’s history other than a vocalist change that at one point seemed to polarize fans of the Newport Beach, CA post-hardcore outfit. Showy, excessive, dynamic, and emotional, the track is much too short at 2:51. But I like it.

    The Cars – “You’re All I’ve Got Tonight” (The Cars, 1978)
    I can remember a time back in the early- to mid-80s in my teens when I used to spin this vinyl at least once a week—back when I actually had the vinyl and a turntable. I have neither these days, but I do have these lovely 0s and 1s to listen to whenever I get the itch for some early Cars goodness. Their debut is still one of the best albums these guys ever released.

    Hayseed Dixie – “Let’s Put the X in Sex” (Kiss My Grass: A Hillbilly Tribute to KISS, 2003)
    I’ve always had this affinity for cover tunes—even more so these days since I discovered the Coverville podcast several years ago—and over the years I’ve amassed quite a few hokey covers of songs that I never really cared for in their original form. “Let’s Put the X in Sex” is once such song, and I would like to forget that one of my favorite bands of all time ever released it. As a matter of fact, I like to pretend that the KISS of Unmasked and onward is some impostor band that has the real Gene Simmons chained up in a dungeon someplace.

    Queensrÿche – “Get a Life” (Hear in the Now Frontier, 1997)
    HITNF was the last Queensrÿche album to feature guitarist and founding member Chris DeGarmo, and in my opinion, was the point where the band began a downward spiral they have yet to pull out of. While I liked quite a bit of the followup Q2K, they have released little since this album that I could really grab onto or identify with as a huge fan of their progressive metal beginnings of The Warning and their excellent 1982 EP.

    • > HITNF was the last Queensrÿche album to feature guitarist and founding member Chris DeGarmo

      Actually what I meant to say was the last to feature DeGarmo as a full-time member. The Tribe album saw him return temporarily to collaborate with the band on a few songs and play guitar.

      • If you haven’t listened to American Soldier, you might be pleasantly surprised.

        • I’ve only heard snippets, but I have added it to my Spotify listening queue. Thanks, sir!

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